Eighth Sister No More: The Origins and Evolution of Connecticut College Paul P. Marthers

ISBN: 9781433112201

Published: November 11th 2010

Paperback

268 pages


Description

Eighth Sister No More: The Origins and Evolution of Connecticut College  by  Paul P. Marthers

Eighth Sister No More: The Origins and Evolution of Connecticut College by Paul P. Marthers
November 11th 2010 | Paperback | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, AUDIO, mp3, ZIP | 268 pages | ISBN: 9781433112201 | 6.34 Mb

When founded in 1911 Connecticut College for Women was a pioneering womens college that sought to prepare the progressive eras new woman to be self-sufficient. Along with Douglass College, Simmons College, Skidmore College, and William SmithMoreWhen founded in 1911 Connecticut College for Women was a pioneering womens college that sought to prepare the progressive eras new woman to be self-sufficient.

Along with Douglass College, Simmons College, Skidmore College, and William Smith College, each of which also emphasized preparation for work in the new fields opening to women, Connecticut and its peers—although path-breaking—have been overlooked by historians of womens higher education. The publication of Eighth Sister No More adds, in a significant way, to the literature on the history of American higher education, making the case for the significance of the story of Connecticut Colleges birth and evolution, and contextualizing Connecticut College in the history of womens education, including illuminating comparisons and contrasts with the Seven Sisters and other less-studied womens colleges.

Eighth Sister No More examines Connecticut College for Womens founding mission and vision—revealing how Connecticut Colleges grassroots founding to provide educational opportunity for women was altered by coeducation, how the College has been shaped by changes in thinking about womens roles and alterations in curricular emphasis, and the role local community ties played at the Colleges point of origin and in the recent presidency of Claire Gaudiani, the only alumna to lead the College.Eighth Sister No More is grounded firmly in the literature on higher education history, especially the history of womens colleges, and raises the provocative issue of whether Connecticut College for Women was a wholly new model in higher education for women or a hybrid of existing models.

The book also places the founding of Connecticut College in the context of the patterns by which other small liberal arts colleges came to be in America. Eighth Sister No More illuminates the prominent role that Wesleyan Universitys unsuccessful experience with coeducation played in the founding of Connecticut College for Women and notes Connecticuts similarities to the so-called booster college.

The final chapter examines Connecticut College in the prism of Burton Clarks definition of the distinctive college that has an organizational saga—in order to clarify what defines Connecticut College and constitutes its evolving mission. Drawing on archival research, oral history interviews, and seminal works on higher education history and womens history, Eighth Sister No More provides a view into the liberal arts segment of American higher education, where many small colleges struggle for sustenance. Examining Connecticut Colleges founding in the context of its evolution illustrates how founding mission and vision inform the way colleges describe what they are and do, and whether there are essential elements of founding mission and vision that must be remembered or preserved.Historians of womens colleges will be drawn to the books examination of the ways in which Connecticut Colleges founding mission mirrored and departed from the model of quality in womens higher education established by the Seven Sister colleges.

The book should be of great interest to those who study and write about the history of American colleges and universities, particularly those who follow the historical development of womens colleges and former womens colleges. Numerous college and municipal libraries will likely want to purchase copies of the book. Beyond the higher education historian audience, Eighth Sister No More will also be of interest to alumnae/i of Connecticut College and to historical societies in Connecticut and the rest of New England.



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